Curtiss P-36C
       
     
Messerschmitt  Bf(Me)109G-4 “Red Seven” D-FWME
       
     
Boeing B-17G G-BEDF & North American P-51D Mustang G-SHWN
       
     
Memphis Belle & Little Friend
       
     
Junkers Ju52 F-AZJU
       
     
Hawker Fury Mk.I
       
     
Bristol Blenheim Mk.I G-BPIV
       
     
Forground: Supermarine Spitfire VIIIc D-FEUR - Background: Hawke
       
     
Grumman TBM Avenger HB-RDG
       
     
Lockheed P-38 Lightning N25Y / 13 - Takeoff
       
     
Lockheed P-38 Lightning N25Y / 13 and B-25J Mitchell N6123C
       
     
B-25J Mitchell N6123C
       
     
Lockheed P-38 Lightning N25Y / 13
       
     
Supermarine Spitfire LFVb EP120 G-LFVB
       
     
North American P-51D Mustang G-SHWN
       
     
Supermarine Spitfire VIIIc D-FEUR
       
     
Curtiss P-36C
       
     
Curtiss P-36C

This is last Curtiss P-36C constructed Serial No. 38-210. Built in 1939 and delivered to Selfridge Field, Michigan in May 1939. She participated in the 1939 Cleveland Air Races in September 1939 with experimental camouflage. She participated in the War Games at Maxwell Field following the Air Races. She was sent to Wright Patterson for testing in 1940 and then on to serve with several different squadrons on the U.S. East Coast. In 1942 she was sent to Chanute Technical Training Command for a few months, thereafter she was labeled obsolete and flown to Buckley field in Colorado. She was put into a Tech School following her decommission and was later acquired by a Pratt & Whitney Tech instructor from Canada, where she resided until a Florida collector acquired it and passed her on to The Fighter Collection more than a decade ago. The restoration commenced some four years ago, under the leadership of Matt Nightingale at Chino, California when sufficient original parts capable of overhaul were recovered to ensure that the aircraft could be completed to fly. Steve Hinton carried out the shakedown flights and the FAA certified P-36C made it first public appearances at the 2015 Planes of Fame Airshow, in unique flights with the Museum’s Sikorsky P-35 in similar markings.

Messerschmitt  Bf(Me)109G-4 “Red Seven” D-FWME
       
     
Messerschmitt Bf(Me)109G-4 “Red Seven” D-FWME

The development history of the Bf (Me) 109 goes back as far as 1934, when the Bavarian Aircraft Works (BFW) in Augsburg which became Messerschmitt AG in 1938 started development of a lightweight fighter plane for a competition held by the Reich Air Ministry (Reichsluftfahrtministerium). Willy Messerschmitt designed the aircraft, which was provisionally given the designation Bf 109, using all of the experience and knowledge on aircraft construction that was available at that time.

Boeing B-17G G-BEDF & North American P-51D Mustang G-SHWN
       
     
Boeing B-17G G-BEDF & North American P-51D Mustang G-SHWN

Taken at the Duxford Flying Legends air show 2015 The B-17G was delivered to the United States Army Air Force on 19 June 1945 as 44-85784. In 1954 the Institut Géographique National in France bought the plane for use as a survey aircraft. In 1975 she moved to England and was registered with the CAA as G-BEDF to be restored to wartime condition. The ‘Sally B’ was used in the 1990 film Memphis Belle as one of 5 flying B-17s needed for various film scenes, and it was used to replicate the real Memphis Belle in one scene. Half of the aircraft is still in the Memphis Belle livery, following restoration of the ‘Sally B’ nose art and the black and yellow checkerboard pattern on the cowling of the starboard inner (no 3) engine, carried as a tribute to Elly Sallingboe’s companion Ted White, whose Harvard aircraft had the same pattern on its cowling.

Memphis Belle & Little Friend
       
     
Memphis Belle & Little Friend

The B-17 Flying Fortress was delivered to the United States Army Air Force on 19 June 1945 as 44-85784. In 1954 the Institut Géographique National in France bought the plane for use as a survey aircraft. In 1975 she moved to England and was registered with the CAA as G-BEDF to be restored to wartime condition. The ‘Sally B’ was used in the 1990 film Memphis Belle as one of 5 flying B-17s needed for various film scenes, and it was used to replicate the real Memphis Belle in one scene. Half of the aircraft is still in the Memphis Belle livery, following restoration of the ‘Sally B’ nose art and the black and yellow checkerboard pattern on the cowling of the starboard inner (no 3) engine, carried as a tribute to Elly Sallingboe’s companion Ted White, whose Harvard aircraft had the same pattern on its cowling. The Little Friend is a North American P-51D Mustang G-SHWN, which was manufactured in 1944 for the United States Army Air Force and registered as military serial number 44-73877. She did not see combat action during WWII. During 1951 she was delivered to the Royal Canadian Air Force where she served until 1958. From 1958 to 1980 the aeroplane was flown by various private owners. After an extensive rebuild from 1980 to 1985 she was registered N167F and bore the ‘Old Crow’ colour scheme of Col. Clarence Anderson who’s signature remains on the left undercarriage door panel. In 2012 she was purchased by a UK owner and delivered to the UK in August that year. Since then the aeroplane has been overhauled and refitted and is now in the colour scheme of Lt. Blanchford, RAF 112 Squadron which operated from Italy in 1945 on ground attack missions over the Balkans and along the Adriatic coast.

Junkers Ju52 F-AZJU
       
     
Junkers Ju52 F-AZJU

In 1931 the German engineer Hugo Junkers designed the Ju52 the prototype of a single engine civil transport aircraft, covered with corrugated metal sheets. This aircraft had an important internal volume but was lacking an effective payload. With the addition of two engines on the wing, the Ju-52 was born. With a payload of 1800kg. The Ju52 was intensively used by the Luftwaffe. Equipped with wheels, skis, or even floats it was the backbone of the military transport. Troup transporter, para-droper, used to supply the army from the eastern Russian steps to the Libyan Desert. This Ju52 is one of the first CASA 352s built in Spain. The fuselage was manufactured in Germany by Junkers and the wings by CASA in 1943.The fuselage was sent to Spain with thirty others, to join the assembly line. After decommission the Ju52 was acquired by a British Movie company. In 1990 she was acquired by Amicale Jean Baptiste Salis and meticulously restored by the Amicale team.

Hawker Fury Mk.I
       
     
Hawker Fury Mk.I

The Hawker Fury is widely regarded as the epitome of biplane fighter development and arguably the most beautiful biplane ever created. Powered by a 525hp Rolls Royce Kestrel IIS V-12 supercharged, water-cooled engine, there are no other known survivors anywhere in the world and thus the aircraft can claim to be unique. It was acquired from South Africa in 1994 after a tip-off from the RAF Museum. The aircraft was delivered to 2 ASU on 20 November 1935 and then to 43 Sqn at RAF Tangmere on 2 June 1936. F/O FE Rosier, later to become Air Chief Marshal Sir Frederick Rosier GCB, CBE, DSO, recorded in his log that the aircraft was his aircraft whilst he was OC B Flight between December 1936 and January 1939. It was called ‘Queen of North and South’. He first flew it on 9 December 1936 and his last flight was on 22 February 1939 when the comment in his log was ‘Last fling in Queen of North and South. Perfect’. After periods at 5 MU and 47 MU the aircraft is recorded ‘to South Africa 5 August 1940’. The aircraft arrived in Durban on ‘Clan Mathieso’ on 20 October 1940. On 15 March 1941 the aircraft, now with the serial number 215, was taken on charge by 13 Squadron (soon to be renumbered 43) based at Swartkop. On 31 March 1941 it ran out of fuel and force landed near Pitsani whilst being flown by 2/Lt Peter M. Hedley. The pilot suffered no injuries but the aircraft suffered Cat 2 damage. Records show the aircraft being stored before being delivered to No.2 Air Depot Kimberley where it was scrapped. Restoration was started in earnest in 1992. (HAC) would only restore this aircraft if it could be 100% authentic down to the smallest detail. The Fury made its first post restoration flight from Goodwood (as close as we could get to Tangmere) on the 30th July 2012.

Bristol Blenheim Mk.I G-BPIV
       
     
Bristol Blenheim Mk.I G-BPIV

The Bristol Blenheim Mk.I is a truly unique British aircraft. As a type the aircrafts history is long and formative and an important milestone in the history of British aviation. Designed as a small airliner in the early 1930s by Frank Barnwell, Chief Designer of the Bristol Aircraft Company, it was funded by Lord Rothermere who named it ‘Britain First’. It proved much faster than the latest biplane fighters, with a speed of over 300mph, and Rothermere promptly donated it to the nation. Barnwell then redesigned the aircraft as a bomber and it became the first stressed skin aircraft with hydraulic actuated undercarriage, flaps and turret to be accepted by the Royal Air Force. It was the fastest bomber of the day and it became the backbone of the RAFs light bomber force. At the start of WWII the RAF had 1089 Blenheim’s in service more than any other type. The Blenheim bore the brunt of daylight operations during the early war years, whilst other bombers were switched to night operations, and the crews paid a heavy price. Many Blenheim’s were lost not only to fighters but to anti-aircraft fire especially when attacking ships. Even so it was well liked by its crews and Churchill paid homage to their bravery comparing them to the ‘Charge of the Light Brigade’.

Forground: Supermarine Spitfire VIIIc D-FEUR - Background: Hawke
       
     
Forground: Supermarine Spitfire VIIIc D-FEUR - Background: Hawke

The Supermarine Spitfire - closest to camera - was built at the Supermarine factory at Southampton. Spitfire VIIIc N3200 made its first flight on 29th November 1939 and after storage, was delivered to 19 Squadron at Duxford on 19th April 1940. When flying from RAF Hornchurch in the hands of Sqn. Ldr. G D Stephenson, it was shot down and made a wheels up landing on the beach near Sangatte, France on 25th May 1940. Covered by the sea and sand, the wreck was forgotten until discovered and recovered in 1986. Acquired by the current owner in 2000 the Spitfire was brought to Duxford and rebuilt by Historic Flying Ltd. It made its first flight on 26th March 2014 in the hands of John Romain.

The Hurricane was the RAF’s first monoplane fighter, going into service before its famous partner in RAF service the Spitfire. The Hurricane was available in greater numbers for its finest hour in the Battle of Britain, where it played a crucial role in the defense of this country, shooting down more enemy aircraft than the Spitfire. Hurricane Mk XIIa 5711 (G-HURI) - furthest from camera - was rebuilt in the 1980’s from the best original Hurricane parts sourced, in the previous 10 years, from all over Canada. It was given the identity of aircraft CCF c/n 72036 as that aircraft was the source of the airframe used in the rebuild. RCAF 5711 had been built in 1942 by the Canadian Car Foundry as part of their sixth production batch and joined the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1943. It is believed to have served with 123 Squadron at Debert before going to 127 and 129 Squadrons at Dartmouth and onto 1 Operational Training Unit at Bagotville.

Grumman TBM Avenger HB-RDG
       
     
Grumman TBM Avenger HB-RDG

The Lausanne based TBM-3E is powered with the original 1925 h.p Wright Double Cyclone R-2600-20 Engine. The aircraft wears the U.S markings worn by the Marine Torpedo Squadron 132 based on the Escort Carrier U.S.S Cape Gloucester during 1945 in the Pacific. During that period, thirty three combat aircraft were based on the 12,000 ton Commencement Bay Class Carrier, twelve of which being TBM-3E’s. Two 2201/58 U.S Gallon droppable wing tanks were fitted between the fuselage and main landing gear legs giving the Avenger extra range.

Lockheed P-38 Lightning N25Y / 13 - Takeoff
       
     
Lockheed P-38 Lightning N25Y / 13 - Takeoff

The Lockheed P-38 Lightning might be one of the most impressive aircrafts in the world of aviation. With its unconventional twin tail, it was commonly used during the Pacific War. The twin Allison engines with 1475 horsepower make the P-38 the perfect warbird for long distances due to its ability to fly higher and faster than other jets built around the same time. Between 1941 and 1945 more than 10,000 aircraft were produced. Today, the P-38 is a very rare model. This is the only one still flying in Europe.

Lockheed P-38 Lightning N25Y / 13 and B-25J Mitchell N6123C
       
     
Lockheed P-38 Lightning N25Y / 13 and B-25J Mitchell N6123C

The B-25 Mitchell was named in honour of General William Mitchell. Between 1941 and 1945, North American Aviation produced about 10,000 B-25 aircraft, characterized by their distinctive twin tail. The aircraft’s trademark features are its glass nose and tail guns. Some versions, like the one used in the Doolittle Raid in the Pacific came equipped with a turret on the upper and lower side of the fuselage instead of a rear gunner station.

The Lockheed P-38 Lightning, flying behind the B-25 in this shot, might be one of the most impressive aircraft in the world of aviation. With its unconventional twin tail, it was commonly used during the Pacific War. The twin Allison engines with 1475 horsepower make the P-38 the perfect warbird for long distances due to its ability to fly higher and faster than other jets built around the same time. Between 1941 and 1945 more than 10,000 aircraft were produced.

Today, the P-38 is a very rare model. This is the only one still flying in Europe.

B-25J Mitchell N6123C
       
     
B-25J Mitchell N6123C

The B-25 Mitchell was named in honor of General William Mitchell. Between 1941 and 1945, North American Aviation produced about 10,000 B-25 aircraft, characterized by their distinctive twin tail. The aircraft’s trademark features are its glass nose and tail guns. Some versions, like the one used in the Doolittle Raid in the Pacific came equipped with a turret on the upper and lower side of the fuselage instead of a rear gunner station.

Lockheed P-38 Lightning N25Y / 13
       
     
Lockheed P-38 Lightning N25Y / 13

The Lockheed P-38 Lightning might be one of the most impressive aircrafts in the world of aviation. With its unconventional twin tail, it was commonly used during the Pacific War. The twin Allison engines with 1475 horsepower make the P-38 the perfect warbird for long distances due to its ability to fly higher and faster than other jets built around the same time. Between 1941 and 1945 more than 10,000 aircraft were produced. Today, the P-38 is a very rare model. This is the only one still flying in Europe.

Supermarine Spitfire LFVb EP120 G-LFVB
       
     
Supermarine Spitfire LFVb EP120 G-LFVB

This Mk.V Spitfire is one of the most credited historic aircraft left anywhere in the world with an impressive SEVEN confirmed kills. EP120 was built at the Castle Bromwich factory where she was probably test flown by the legend that was Alex Henshaw. She was taken on charge by the RAF in May 1942 with 45 MU at Kinloss in Scotland. She was assigned to 501 Sqn the following month and scored six of her confirmed kills with Sqn Ldr Geoffrey Northcott at the helm. A ground collision saw her returned to Castle Bromwich for repair following which she was allocated to 19 Sqn in Cornwall. In April 1944 she was taken on charge with 402 Sqn ‘City of Winnipeg’ RCAF, coded AE-A, which are the colours she wears today.

North American P-51D Mustang G-SHWN
       
     
North American P-51D Mustang G-SHWN

This aircraft was manufactured in 1944 for the United States Army Air Force and registered as military serial number 44-73877. She did not see combat action during WWII.

During 1951 she was delivered to the Royal Canadian Air Force where she served until 1958.

From 1958 to 1980 the aeroplane was flown by various private owners. After an extensive rebuild from 1980 to 1985 she was registered N167F and bore the ‘Old Crow’ colour scheme of Col. Clarence Anderson who’s signature remains on the left undercarriage door panel.

In 2012 she was purchased by a UK owner and delivered to the UK in August that year. Since then the aeroplane has been overhauled and refitted and is now in the colour scheme of Lt. Blanchford, RAF 112 Squadron which operated from Italy in 1945 on ground attack missions over the Balkans and along the Adriatic coast.

Supermarine Spitfire VIIIc D-FEUR
       
     
Supermarine Spitfire VIIIc D-FEUR

Built as MV154 in 1944 at Southampton, delivered to 6MU the same year. She was ferried by the famous ATA-girl Mary Wilkens (some decades later, Mary Wilkens signed, now at the age of 94, in the cockpit. A wonderful piece of history). In September 1944 the Spitfire was shipped to Australia where she arrived at the end of November and was stored. In 1948, MV154 was assembled and used for some system testing. In 1961 the rare fighter was sold to “Titus” Oates who wanted to bring her back to airworthy condition.

The plan failed and the MkVIIIc was sold to Sid Marshall who stored the aeroplane in his museum. Robs Lamplough acquired her in 1979 and brought her back to Great Britain. After 15 years of restoration, this Spitfire took the skies over Filton on 28th May 1994. In 2010 G-BKMI was sold to Meier Motors based at the former military airfield Bremgarten in the South of Germany. Following restoration work, the MkVIIIc was registered in Germany as D-FEUR. She was the first Spitfire registered in Germany since the end of WWII. This aircraft is operated by Max Alpha Aviation Gmbh, also based in Eschbach, Bremgarten airfield.